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Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Free of Charge, Method Initiation, and Abortion Rates in Finland

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Public Health, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
86 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
Title
Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Free of Charge, Method Initiation, and Abortion Rates in Finland
Published in
American Journal of Public Health, April 2018
DOI 10.2105/ajph.2017.304280
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frida Gyllenberg, Mikael Juselius, Mika Gissler, Oskari Heikinheimo

Abstract

To evaluate whether a public program providing long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods free of charge increases the LARC initiation rate and reduces the unintended pregnancy rate in the general population. Since 2013, all women in Vantaa, Finland, have been entitled to 1 LARC method free of charge. With time-series analysis between 2000 and 2015, we assessed whether this public program was associated with changes in steady-state mean rates of LARC initiation and abortions. The initiation rate of LARCs (1/1000 women) increased 2.2-fold from 1.9 to 4.2 after the intervention (P < .001). Concomitantly, the abortion rate (1/1000 women) declined by 16% from 1.1 to 0.9 in the total sample (P < .001), by 36% from 1.3 to 0.8 among those aged 15 to 19 years (P < .001), and by 14% from 2.0 to 1.7 among those aged 20 to 24 years (P = .01). The LARC program was associated with increased uptake of LARC methods and fewer abortions in the population. Public Health Implications. Entitling the population to LARC methods free of charge is an effective means to reduce the unmet need of contraception and the need for abortion, especially among women younger than 25 years. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print February 22, 2018: e1-e6. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2017.304280).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 86 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 4 22%
Student > Master 3 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 17%
Researcher 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Other 4 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 33%
Social Sciences 3 17%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Mathematics 1 6%
Other 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 82. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2019.
All research outputs
#197,618
of 13,370,991 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Public Health
#506
of 10,673 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,978
of 269,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Public Health
#15
of 172 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,370,991 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,673 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,284 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 172 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.